Announcing SHARE’s National Expansion

New Support Groups Active in Norwalk, CT; Brentwood, NY; and Orlando, FL
After 42 years in New York City, SHARE Cancer Support has announced a national expansion effort. Norwalk, CT; Brentwood, Long Island, NY; and Orlando, FL are the first cities outside New York City to offer SHARE’s in-person services to women with breast or ovarian cancers.

Introducing new program formats!

If you receive our program calendar or email newsletter, you may have noticed some new types of educational programs. In addition to our webinars and in-person programs, we are now offering interactive educational opportunities through other platforms. These new kinds of programs offer the same quality content, and make it easy for you to engage with the presenters.

SHARE Women Featured in Story About BRCA Mutations

Manhattan newspaper Chelsea Now recently ran a story about women who discovered they had a BRCA mutation and how they chose to take preventative action-- or what they decided to do instead. Featured in the story are SHARE's own Breast Cancer Program Director Christine Benjamin, who was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer at age 36 and later found she had an abnormal BRCA1 gene, Ovarian Helpline Coordinator Andrea Herzberg, who had been treated for late stage ovarian cancer before finding she has the BRCA2 mutation, and Deborah Polinsky, a SHARE ovarian cancer support group facilitator and patient advocate living with the BRCA1 mutation.

Potential Benefits for NYC Women with Breast or Ovarian Cancer

SHARE would like to let its constituents know about a program that offers benefits to women in New York City who may have been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer as a result of 9/11.

The James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 established a World Trade Center Health Program to provide high-quality, compassionate healthcare for survivors of 9/11 who lived, worked, or were attending school in the area.

A Bit of Advocate in All of Us

This is a guest blog post by ovarian cancer advocate Dorinda “Dee” Sparacio.
Through the years I have worked as a chemical engineer, packaging engineer, and high school computer science and math teacher. When I was diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer in 2005, I did not realize that I would “work” as an advocate longer than I held any of those positions.

Financial Toxicity and Cancer

This post was written by Teri Pollastro.

Over the last several years we have heard about precision medicine, payment reform and patient-centered care. While I was at ASCO this year, I heard a new buzz word; financial toxicity. The phenomenon of financial toxicity has been whispered about for years.

National Helpline:
844-ASK-SHARE