Blog

Roberta Hufnagel, Metastatic Support Group Facilitator

Roberta Hufnagel, Metastatic Support Group Facilitator

I’m a social worker and psychotherapist and I’m now 70 years old. I was just 36 when told I needed a mastectomy and a year of chemo. I learned about SHARE 5 years later and became a group facilitator soon after. In 1986 SHARE began the only metastatic breast cancer support group in NYC, and perhaps the only one in the country. I became the facilitator and have led the group ever since. SHARE now offers three groups, for women living with metastatic breast cancer. Two groups (which I facilitate) meet weekly and the third group meets monthly. Two of the groups meet in SHARE’s NYC office and the other group is conducted via conference call. The phone group enables women to have the advantages of peer support if they are either too far from Manhattan or are unable to come into the office.

Jo: Lat-Flap Reconstruction

Jo: Lat-Flap Reconstruction

A recent article in the New York Times referred to a study showing that women who’d had reconstructive surgery reported higher quality of life than women who opted not to have reconstruction after a mastectomy. We were puzzled by that, since reconstruction prolongs physical recovery and sometimes results in complications.

Robin’s Story

Robin’s Story

In 2008 I was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer at the age of 27. This is not something that you expect to hear at this age. After talking with Dr. Makhoul at UAMS and getting a plan I was ready to hit this head on. I knew that I was fighting this disease for my two boys at home that were 6 and 3. I wanted to fight harder so I could be around to watch them grow up.

Eileen: Blogging About Her Experiences

Eileen: Blogging About Her Experiences

I was diagnosed October 25th, 2005 with an aggressively-growing estrogen-driven breast cancer on my right breast. I had a (big) lumpectomy and a bilateral reduction at the same time, ACT for the chemo and 5 weeks of radiation.

Now I'm on tamoxifen and struggling with the decision to move to aromasin.

Gina: Breast Cancer after Hodgkins Disease

Gina: Breast Cancer after Hodgkins Disease

I was diagnosed with breast cancer when a lump was found in my right breast. Chemotherapy was not prescribed because my Oncotype was so low. It seemed it would be a simple case. But then a smaller, very aggressive malignant tumor was found in my left breast.

Mimi: Being A Lesbian With Breast Cancer

Mimi: Being A Lesbian With Breast Cancer

In 2006, while in my 20s, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. As many people know first-hand, a cancer diagnosis changes your life overnight. I went from being, I thought, a healthy young singer-actress with a day job, to being a full-time medical patient who still had to hold onto that day job for dear life because I needed the money and health insurance. And, once again, the difficulty of being a lesbian in a heterosexual world reared its ugly head.

Megan: Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

Megan: Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

When women call the SHARE helpline and tell me they’ve just been diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer, I know how scared they are. Often they’ve consulted Dr. Google and learned that HER2-positive cancers are especially aggressive and likely to recur. I know, because Dr. Google told me the same thing seven years ago.

National Helpline:
844-ASK-SHARE