Blog

Avastin: Breast Cancer Drug or NOT? Testimony to ODAC

In July, I testified against the use of Avastin as a first-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer. I was representing SHARELeaders at a public meeting of the Oncology Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC), which advises the FDA on whether or not to approve drugs for cancer treatment.

Yes– You Really Can Help Cure Breast Cancer

We often read about exciting research breakthroughs in understanding cancer. These breakthroughs have to be further refined in the lab and then tested in real women in properly supervised “clinical trials”. Real women of all types are needed for these tests – whether you have had breast cancer or not, all races and nationalities, all ages – as large and diverse a pool as possible.

Triple Negative Breast Cancer

A breast cancer diagnosis of “triple negative” can leave you—as it did me—feeling helpless and clueless. The received wisdom is that Triple Negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particularly threatening cancer type for which there is seldom a good outcome. But as usual, received wisdom is not the whole truth.

What to Do When You Learn Someone Has Cancer

When you learn that a friend or family member has a cancer diagnosis, what do you do? This can be a difficult experience, and it’s hard to know how to act. Sometimes it’s even more important to be aware of what NOT to do. Having been on the receiving end of some wonderful responses, and some really awful ones, when I told people about my cancer diagnosis, here are some suggestions.

Marilyn: Supporting Other Breast Cancer Survivors

Marilyn: Supporting Other Breast Cancer Survivors

I'm a 19-year breast cancer survivor, and I co-facilitate two SHARE support groups in Queens. These groups help women get the support and information they need to deal with breast cancer. The members are really good about helping each other out -- we all work together, and many members become buddies to other members.

Cancer As A Turning Point

Cancer As A Turning Point

My story begins in June 2008. On a lovely Saturday afternoon, while celebrating my young son's fifth birthday, I noticed that there was a big lump in my left breast.

At this point, I prefer not to further elaborate on the medical situation I was thrown into due to that lump but rather share with you what it has done to my life and how I grew stronger, happier and a better human being as a result.

Megan: I Chose Not To Have Reconstruction

Megan: I Chose Not To Have Reconstruction

SHARE volunteer Megan Rutherford describes her decision not to have breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. 

I was lucky. Because I had my bilateral mastectomy after chemotherapy, I had ample time to consider my options, a luxury many breast cancer patients don't have.

Meet Eileen

Meet Eileen

I first met Eileen at the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN) conference in Baltimore last year. She stood out from the crowd, partly because of her fabulous shoes but also because she was incredibly vivacious. Eileen’s story was compelling to me and I asked her to write about her experience. She told me she had just written something and sent it along. What I discovered were select journal entries from her original diagnosis in 2008. What I love about this is how Eileen expresses her concerns and fears in what she calls “Thought for the day”, and how her personality, determination and actions are expressed in “What I know for sure”. Recently, at NBCC, I ran into Eileen and her daughter who is an emerging leader. Eileen danced the entire night ( I have proof) and had what looked like a hell of a lot of fun doing it. “This” she said, pointing to herself, “is the face of metastatic breast cancer”. -Christine Benjamin

Jennie’s Story

Jennie’s Story

The idea of breast cancer wasn't new to me when I felt a lump in my breast three months after I missed my scheduled mammogram in 2000 (my cousin had been treated for breast cancer and I had done walks to raise money for the disease). Still, I didn't think it applied to me so I waited a couple of weeks before I called my doctor.

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